rum drinks of yore lore

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lady ermenegildo zegna
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Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:35 am

At Loggerheads.

During the colonial times in America, the colonists would often begin their night of dinner and drink at a tavern with the 'rum flip'.
Rum Flip:
1 part rum
2 parts beer
1 egg or small amount of cream if desired
sugar to taste
these ingredients were mixed together in a large tankard and brought to near boil whilst being stirred with a hot poker from the fireplace.
the poker was called a loggerhead.
more oft than not a colonist would overindulge and an argument would erupt. These arguments were commonly settled when one colonist would reach for the nearby hot poker. The other party would try to wrest the poker away or attempt to reach for his own and even his odds.

hence, the expression 'at loggerheads' was coined.
"I drink to make other people interesting." — George Jean Nathan

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Count Silvio
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Wed Oct 31, 2007 12:08 pm

Ahh ye olde flip. I remember reading about this from Wayne Curtis' and A Bottle of Rum book.

Here is the recipe from the book:

"Mix one cup beer (a stout like Guinness works best), two tablespoons of molasses, and one ounce Jamaican-style rum into a mug or tankard. Heat loggerhead to red hot in an open fire (a fireplace poker knocked clean of ashed will do), then thrust into drink. Keep loggerhead in place until foaming and sputtering ceases.

Drink hot."
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Scottes
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Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:47 pm

Dildo's Bumbo

Ingredients

6 oz Appleton VX
3 oz Appleton Extra
3 oz Coruba
3 oz Wray & Nephew White Overproof
3 oz pomegranate juice
1 tbs grated fresh nutmeg
1 stick Ceylonese cinnamon
4 tbs raw sugar (turbinado, muscovado, or demerara)
? tbs more sugar
1 750 ml capacity bottle

How to Make

Part I

Combine the nutmeg with the W&N WO.
Combine the sugar with the pomegranate juice.
Drop the cinnamon stick down into the bottle and pour in the Extra.

Part II

Combine the nutmeg white rum with the Coruba.
Combine the sugar and pomegranate with the VX.

Part III

Pour the nutmeg white and dark into the bottle.
Pour the sugar and pomegranate rum into the bottle.
If there is more room in the bottle put more sugar to personal taste.
If it needs more sugar and there's no room, drink off enough to make room.
Cap it off and shake well.

Part IV

Basically, it's ready now, but the longer you wait to use it the better it gets. As it sits, more nutmeg and more cinnamon essence is extracted.

To chill, wrap a wet towel around the bottle and let it sit in a strong breeze OR place it in a net tied to a line and drop it into the cold sea for a bit.

Serves 12 landlubbers; or 4 scurvy dogs; or 1 pirate

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Rum Runner
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Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:12 pm

Dear Lady Emenegildo. A wonderful post on a long lost concoction. I too, came across a recipe favoured by the American colony.. It's called a "Shrub". I think this may have come from the Motherland or possibly up from a colony in the Caribbean. It consists of macerating fresh whole berries in vineger until the fruit colour begins to wane. Then add a good cup full of sugar and boil until a syrup is achieved. Strain the mixture, bottle it, and cool in the cellar. To mount the "Shrub" pour a good amount of rum into a vessel of choice and then add a dollop of the syrup. I have tried this and "modernized" it with the addition of ice to the final drink with agreeable results. It makes for a wonderful "sweet/tart" interplay to the rum and a wonderful evocation of the fruit comes through on the palate. My own admixture consists of a tall glass filled with ice. A good splash of a lightish rum, and the the shrub syrup to taste. Finished with a sprig of mint. I have made the shrub from raspberries, blackberries, currants, as well as fresh mangoes from my small finca here in the West Indies. All with good results. Regards.
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Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:20 pm

Scottes wrote:Dildo's Bumbo

Dear Scottes. Thank you for a very detailed and indivdual recipe! I wonder if it is a drink of "yore" though?
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Scottes
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Fri Nov 09, 2007 12:50 am

It is, in a way, since its based on the Bombo - just with modern ingredients.

"If I was going to raise a glass to America, it would contain grog or a rum flip or the mixture of rum, water, molasses and nutmeg that buccaneers used to call a bombo."

The bombo doesn't sound too exciting. Dildo's Bumbo was emptied enthusiastically by a number of people.

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Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:36 am

Scottes wrote:It is, in a way, since its based on the Bombo - just with modern ingredients.

"If I was going to raise a glass to America, it would contain grog or a rum flip or the mixture of rum, water, molasses and nutmeg that buccaneers used to call a bombo."

The bombo doesn't sound too exciting. Dildo's Bumbo was emptied enthusiastically by a number of people.
Thank you for illuminating the link to the past for your recipe.
Let Debrett's Peerage be your guide

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lady ermenegildo zegna
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Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:29 pm

bumbo. bombo or bomboo is indeed a drink of yore my dear sirs.

due to the oft shorter voyages undertaken by pirates and merchantmen of yore and the resultingly free availabilty of fruit, these scallywags and entrepreneurs suffered from the scury to a much lesser extent. to this end, citrus was not used as a sweetener in their drink concoctions and nutmeg and sugar featured instead.

interestingly, voters were enticed during colonial times with such enticing batches of grog, that tasted better than the british navy slops, leading to the reference of, "swilling the planters with bumbo".

George Washington famously used this technique. His papers state that he used 160 gallons of rum to treat 391 voters to bumbo during campaigning for the Virginia House of Burgesses in July 1758
"I drink to make other people interesting." — George Jean Nathan

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